9 Sailors Suffer Minor Injuries in Fire Aboard Aircraft Carrier USS Abraham Lincoln

The crew of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) extinguished a fire that broke out Tuesday, U.S. 3rd Fleet announced Wednesday. Lincoln is currently operating approximately 30 miles off the coast of southern California and will continue to do so despite the fire, Lt. Samuel Boyle, 3rd Fleet spokesperson, told USNI News. Boyle could not give a […]

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) sails in formation during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2022, July 28, 2022. US Navy Photo

The crew of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) extinguished a fire that broke out Tuesday, U.S. 3rd Fleet announced Wednesday.

Lincoln is currently operating approximately 30 miles off the coast of southern California and will continue to do so despite the fire, Lt. Samuel Boyle, 3rd Fleet spokesperson, told USNI News.

Boyle could not give a damage assessment of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier other than to say it is, “still operating.”

The fire was “quickly” extinguished by crew without assistance from other units, Boyle said. He did not have a specific timeline for when the fire was reported and put out.

Nine sailors reported minor injuries, with the majority of them coming from dehydration, Boyle said. The sailors were treated aboard Lincoln, according to the 3rd Fleet release.

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

Lincoln departed San Diego earlier this week for a sustainment underway, according to ship spotters. The strike group returned from a more than seven-month deployment in August to the Western Pacific.

‘Assault Carrier’ Tests Show How Marine F-35Bs Can Operate with Navy Aircraft Carriers, Says 7th Fleet Commander

ANNAPOLIS, MD., — This summer’s experimentation with the amphibious assault ship USS Tripoli (LHA-7) explored how an America-class big-deck amphibious warship can better work in concert with a carrier strike group, the commander of U.S. 7th Fleet said Friday. With F-35B Lighting II Joint Strike Fighters aboard for several months, Tripoli experimented with what some are […]

USS Tripoli (LHA-7) departs Naval Air Station North Island, Calif., April 7, 2022. US Navy Photo

ANNAPOLIS, MD., — This summer’s experimentation with the amphibious assault ship USS Tripoli (LHA-7) explored how an America-class big-deck amphibious warship can better work in concert with a carrier strike group, the commander of U.S. 7th Fleet said Friday.

With F-35B Lighting II Joint Strike Fighters aboard for several months, Tripoli experimented with what some are calling the “assault carrier” concept, Vice Adm. Karl Thomas said Friday during an event co-hosted by the Center for Strategic and International Studies and the U.S. Naval Institute.

“One day you can have F-35Bs on the flight deck, the next day you could have MV-22s and you can be putting Marines ashore. And so it just is a very versatile instrument and the fact that you have 14 5th-gen fighters on board – it’s an incredibly capable sensor,” Thomas said. “And so we’re still in the experimentation phase. We wanted to at least try to find out how would you integrate an assault carrier with a full-sized carrier. What missions might it be able to do?”

The experimentation on Tripoli was part of an evolution of the Navy and Marine Corps’ “lightning carrier” concept on big-deck amphibious warships. In June, Tripoli participated in exercise Valiant Shield with carriers USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76).

“What we found is we distributed our three large decks for a period of time,” Thomas said of Valiant Shield.

“There’s mission sets that I think that it’ll be designed for. I think that there are regions where it can operate in a better capacity. And then I think that because of the vertical takeoff nature of the F-35, you can find yourself putting F-35s in [Expeditionary Advanced Base Operations] and maybe bring them back out to the ship for some maintenance and you move them elsewhere,” he added. “Maybe you latch them up with the carrier and you use the command and control of the electronic countermeasure capability of the [E2-D Advanced Hawkeye and the EA-18G Growlers]. So we’re still in the experiment phase.”

Vice Adm. Karl Thomas, commander, U.S. 7th Fleet, speaks to the crew of mine countermeasures ship USS Pioneer (MCM-9) over the ship’s 1MC during a tour, June 9, 2022. US Navy Photo

Thomas pointed to the United Kingdom Royal Navy’s experimentation with a squadron of U.S. Marine Corps F-35Bs and Royal Air Force F-35Bs operating on carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08) and Japan flying the F-35B off the Japanese helicopter destroyer JS Izumo (DDH-183) as examples of allied nations also using the aircraft.

“So it also allows our allies and partners to see the capability you can bring with F-35Bs on the flattop,” he said.

Thomas also discussed Beijing’s reaction to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s (D-Calif.) trip to Taiwan earlier this year. He described the military drills and missile firings in response to the visit as “irresponsible.”

“I think that we have a responsibility through the Taiwan Relations Act to provide a defensive capability to Taiwan and to make sure that we’re ready and we are. Our desire would be to have a peaceful resolution of cross-strait differences,” he said. “The PRC says that that’s their desire, but when you see them fire ballistic missiles over Taiwan and have them land in the maritime commons and the shipping lines and some of them actually landed in the Japanese economic exclusion zone – that’s why I attach that word, irresponsible.”

Thomas also noted last week’s trilateral ballistic missile exercise between the United States, Japan and South Korea in the Sea of Japan after North Korea fired intermediate-range ballistic missiles over Japan.

“Certainly Japan itself is looking at its own ballistic missile defenses. But I would also tell you the PRC has ballistic missiles,” Thomas said.
“Having ballistic missile defense is not only to protect our allies and partners, it’s to protect ourselves and our ships are extremely capable. And so having that ballistic missile defense capability is something that I would want on every one of my [cruiser-destroyer] ships just from a multi-domain capability.”

Tests Found E. Coli in Carrier USS Abraham Lincoln’s Potable Water System

Tests found that aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) had E. coli bacteria in its potable water system last month, the Navy announced today. After sailors noted an “odor and cloudy appearance” on Sept. 21 while the carrier was operating at sea, tests the next day found E. coli in the three of the ship’s […]

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), the lead ship of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, returned to Naval Air Station North Island on Aug. 11, 2022, after a deployment to U.S. 3rd and 7th Fleets. U.S. Navy Photo

Tests found that aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) had E. coli bacteria in its potable water system last month, the Navy announced today.
After sailors noted an “odor and cloudy appearance” on Sept. 21 while the carrier was operating at sea, tests the next day found E. coli in the three of the ship’s tanks for the potable water supply, according to a service statement.

“The odor and cloudiness in the water abated by Sept. 22. However, since the presence of E. coli was not related to the reports of odor and cloudiness in the water, on Sept. 24, additional water samples were sent to Orange Coast Analytical, Inc., a laboratory certified by the state of California’s Department of Health, for further testing. Results came back on Sept. 26 indicating that the water was within drinking water standards for pH, turbidity, aluminum, copper, lead, sodium, and hardness,” the statement reads.

The Navy said that subsequent tests show the water tanks no longer contain E. coli and that there have been no cases of sickness due to the contaminated water.

“The affected water tanks remain isolated and will be deep-cleaned and inspected during the ship’s ongoing maintenance period,” the statement reads. “There have been no confirmed cases of illness related to the ship’s water, but the Abraham Lincoln medical department continues to closely monitor their sailors for any potential symptoms.”

After discovering the E. coli, the ship pulled into Naval Air Station North Island on Oct. 3 and has been getting its water from San Diego’s supply.

The incident comes after USS Nimitz (CVN-68) spent nearly two weeks flushing jet fuel out of its potable water system last month. Nimitz also had to hook up to San Diego water. As of Oct. 2, the Navy said 11 Nimitz sailors “reported symptoms that could be attributed to JP-5 ingestion.”

Earlier this month, the Navy acknowledged that Abraham Lincoln had bacteria in its potable water, but did not specify the bacteria was E. coli.

“USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) found traces of bacteria in the ship’s potable water while operating off the coast of southern California on September 21. The crew shifted water tanks to isolate the affected water,” U.S. 3rd Fleet spokesman Cmdr. Sean Robertsons told USNI News in an Oct. 3 statement. “All tanks providing water to the crew have been tested and are bacteria free. The crew has safe water to drink. There have been no confirmed cases of illness related to the ship’s water. The health and wellbeing of our sailors is a top priority.”

USNI News Fleet and Marine Tracker: Oct. 3, 2022

These are the approximate positions of the U.S. Navy’s deployed carrier strike groups and amphibious ready groups throughout the world as of Oct. 3, 2022, based on Navy and public data. In cases where a CSG or ARG is conducting disaggregated operations, the chart reflects the location of the capital ship. Ships Underway Total Battle […]

USNI News Graphic

These are the approximate positions of the U.S. Navy’s deployed carrier strike groups and amphibious ready groups throughout the world as of Oct. 3, 2022, based on Navy and public data. In cases where a CSG or ARG is conducting disaggregated operations, the chart reflects the location of the capital ship.

Ships Underway

Total Battle Force Deployed Underway
300*
(USS 242, USNS 58)
*as of Sept. 28, 2022 per NVR
102
(USS 66, USNS 36)
 76
(50 Deployed, 26 Local)

Ships Deployed by Fleet

2nd Fleet 3rd Fleet 4th Fleet 5th Fleet 6th Fleet 7th Fleet Total
2 1 3 12 27 57 102

In the Western Pacific

An MH-60S Knight Hawk attached to the ‘Golden Falcons’ of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 12, hovers in front of USS Ronald Reagan (CVN -6), an unidentified U.S. Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine, Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62), Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Benfold (DDG-65), Republic of Korea (ROK) Navy destroyer ROKS Munmu the Great (DDH 976) and Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) destroyer JS Asahi (DD 119), as they steam in formation in waters east of the Korean Peninsula, Sept. 30, 2022. US Navy Photo

The Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group is operating in the Western Pacific – just to the east of northern Japan.

Carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) and guided-missile destroyer USS Barry (DDG-52), left Busan, the Republic of Korea last week. Reagan made the first carrier port call to South Korea since 2017, according to U.S. 7th Fleet.

Last week, Reagan drilled in the East China Sea with Korean destroyers ROKS Munmu the Great (DDH-976), ROKS Gwanggaeto the Great (DDH-971), ROKS Seoae Ryu Seong-ryong (DDG-993) and frigate ROKS Gangwon (FFG-815).

Reagan, Chancellorsville, guided-missile destroyer USS Benfold (DDG-65) and an unnamed U.S. submarine drilled with Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) destroyer JS Asahi (DD-119) and RoK Navy destroyer ROKS Munmu the Great (DDH-976), according to U.S. 7th Fleet.

Carrier Strike Group 5

USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) and Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force JS Asahi (DD-119), steam in formation in waters east of the Korean Peninsula on Sept. 30, 2022. US Navy Photo

Aircraft carrier
Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), homeported in Yokosuka, Japan.

Carrier Air Wing 5

Capt. Michael Sweeney, commanding officer of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, and Capt. Fred Goldhammer, commanding officer of USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), approach for a landing on the flight deck in an F/A-18F Super Hornet, attached to the ‘Diamondbacks’ of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 102, in the waters east of the Korean Peninsula on Oct. 1, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, based at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, is embarked aboard Ronald Reagan and includes a total of nine squadrons and detachments:

  • The “Royal Maces” of VFA-27 – Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) – from Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan.
  • The “Diamondbacks” of VFA-102 from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Eagles” of VFA-115 from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Dambusters” of VFA-195 from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Shadowhawks” of VAQ-141 – Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) – from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Tiger Tails” of VAW-125 – Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) – from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Providers” of VRC-30 – Detachment 5 – Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) – from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Golden Falcons” of HSC-12 – Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) – from Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Japan.
  • The “Saberhawks” of HSM-77 – Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) – from Naval Air Facility Atsugi.

Cruisers

Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) steams in formation alongside USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) on Sept. 29, 2022. US Navy Photo

 

 

  • USS Chancellorsville (CG-62), homeported in Yokosuka, Japan.

Destroyer Squadron 15

Republic of Korea Navy Sailors prepare to moor the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Barry (DDG-52) during a port visit to Busan, Republic of Korea on Sept. 23, 2022. US Navy Photo

Destroyer Squadron 15 is based in Yokosuka, Japan, and is embarked on the carrier. Destroyers from Destroyer Squadron 15 are also assigned to the Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group.

  • USS Benfold (DDG-65), homeported in Yokosuka.
  • USS Barry (DDG-52), homeported in Yokosuka.

In the South China Sea

Marines prepare an MV-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 262 (Reinforced) for stowage on the flight deck aboard amphibious assault carrier USS Tripoli (LHA-7) Oct. 3, 2022. US Navy Photo

Amphibious assault ship USS Tripoli (LHA-7) and embarked elements of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) made a port call to Manila, Philippines, last week. Starting today, Tripoli and 31st MEU elements will participate in Exercise Kamandag through Oct 14. Kamandag is an annual joint exercise with the Philippine Marine Corps and troops from the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force.

Tripoli departed Naval Station San Diego, Calif., for an independent deployment to the Western Pacific on May 2.

Prior to embarking the 31st MEUTripoli had been operating under the “lightning carrier” concept, in which it had more than a dozen F-35Bs aboard during its Pacific deployment. The ship is underway with Marine MV-22B Ospreys and CH-53E Super Stallions for the remainder of its Indo-Pacific deployment.

Tripoli took part in the June Valiant Shield exercise but has transitioned to an amphibious ready force with the Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 262 (Reinforced) embarked. Since it began its deployment in May, Tripoli has also had a detachment of MH-60S Knight Hawks embarked from the “Wildcards” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 23.

In the Ionian Sea

An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to Carrier Air Wing 7 approaches the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77) on Oct. 1, 2022. US Navy Photo

The George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group (CSG) remains on station in the Ionian Sea. The CSG left Norfolk, Va., on Aug. 10 and took over duties in U.S. 6th Fleet Aug 28.

Last week, the CSG operated with the Spanish Navy. Ships and units included Carrier Strike Group 10, USS George H. W. Bush (CVN-77), Carrier Air Wing 7, Destroyer Squadron 26, USS Truxtun (DDG-103), and Spanish Navy ships ESPS Juan Carlos I (LHD 61), ESPS Navarra(F 85), and ESPS Castilla (L52), according to the Navy.

Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 (SNMG 2) is also operating in the Mediterranean Sea. U.S. Navy Rear Adm. Scott Sciretta, who assumed command of the formation on July 1, is embarked aboard Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Forrest Sherman (DDG-98) as SNMG 2’s flagship.

Carrier Strike Group 10

USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77), sails alongside the supply-class fast combat support ship USNS Arctic (T-AOE-8) during a replenishment-at-sea on Sept. 29, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier
USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77), homeported in Norfolk, Va.

Carrier Air Wing 7

Chief Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) Andrew Howard watches as the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77), sails alongside the supply-class fast combat support ship USNS Arctic (T-AOE-8) during a replenishment-at-sea, Sept. 29, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7, based on Naval Air Station Oceana, Va., is embarked on Bush and includes:

  • The “Pukin’ Dogs” of VFA-143 Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) flying F/A-18Es from Naval Air Station Oceana, Va.
  • The “Jolly Rogers” of VFA-103 – F/A-18F – from Naval Air Station Oceana.
  • The “Sidewinders” of VFA-86 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Lemoore, Calif.
  • The “Knighthawks” of VFA-136 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Lemoore.
  • The “Patriots” of VAQ-140 – EA-18G – Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) – from Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash.
  • The “Bluetails” of VAW-121 – E-2D – Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk, Va.
  • The “Rawhides” of VRC-40 – Detachment – C-2A – Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk.
  • The “Nightdippers” of HSC-5 – MH-60S – Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk.
  • The “Grandmasters” of HSM-46 – MH-60R – Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) – from Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla.

Cruiser

Sailors assigned to the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55) stand watch on the bridge wing as the ship arrives in Souda Bay, Greece for a port visit, Sept. 27, 2022. US Navy Photo

USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk, Va.

Destroyer Squadron 26

Interior Communications Electrician Seaman Jennifer Mclaurin inspects the seatel antenna aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG-94) while transiting the Bab Al Mandeb Strait, Oct. 2, 2022. US Navy Photo

Destroyer Squadron 26 is based in Norfolk and is embarked on the carrier. The following ships deployed with the strike group.

  • USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), homeported at Naval Station Mayport, Fla.
  • USS Truxtun (DDG-103), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.
  • USS Farragut (DDG-99), homeported at Naval Station Mayport.
  • USS Nitze (DDG-94), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.

In the Mid-Atlantic

Marine Corps Cpl. Dylan Hoover, ammo technician assigned to Combat Logistics Battalion 26, 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, earns the rank of corporal aboard San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS Arlington (LPD-24), Oct. 1, 2022. US Marine Corps Photo

The Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) and the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) have departed the Baltic Sea are in the Mid-Atlantic – headed home. The ARG includes USS Kearsarge (LHD-3), USS Arlington (LPD-24) and USS Gunston Hall (LSD-44).

The 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit is based in North Carolina and includes the command element; the aviation combat element, Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron, 263 (Reinforced); the ground combat element, Battalion Landing Team 2/6; and the logistics combat element, Combat Logistics Battalion 26.

The Kearsarge ARG is commanded by Amphibious Squadron Six. Other Navy units in the ARG include Fleet Surgical Team 2, Tactical Air Control Squadron 22, Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 28, Assault Craft Unit 2, Assault Craft Unit 4, Naval Beach Group 2 and Beach Master Unit 2.

In Norfolk, Va.

An MH-60S Knight Hawk, attached to the ‘Tridents’ of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 9, approaches the first-in-class aircraft carrier USS Gerald R. Ford’s (CVN-78) flight deck during an ammunition onload, Sept. 25, 2022. US Navy Photo

The Gerald R. Ford Carrier Strike Group (CSG) was scheduled to leave for what the Navy has called a “service retained deployment,” on Monday but was delayed by a weather front, U.S. 2nd Fleet told The Virginian Pilot on Sunday.

Commissioned in 2017, USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) will operate in the North Atlantic ahead of a deployment under the Global Force Management Plan scheduled for next year. Ford features 43 new technologies, including the Electro-Magnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS), the Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG), the Dual-Band Radar, advanced weapons elevators and a new design of A1B reactors.

Carrier Strike Group 10

USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) while in homeport in Norfolk, Virginia, on April 7, 2022. USNI News Photo

Carrier
USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk, Va.

Carrier Air Wing 8 (8 Squadrons)

An E2-D Hawkeye, attached to the ‘Greyhawks’ of Airborne Command and Control Squadron (VAW) 120, performs start up procedures on the flight deck of the first-in-class aircraft carrier USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) during flight operations on Sept. 22, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8, based on Naval Air Station Oceana, Va., will embark on Ford and includes 8 squadrons and detachments:

  • The “Golden Warriors” of VFA-87 Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) flying F/A-18Es from Naval Air Station Oceana, Va.
  • The “Ragin’ Bulls” of VFA-37 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Oceana.
  • The “Black Lions” of VFA-213 – F/A-18F – from Naval Air Station Oceana.
  • The “Gray Wolves” of VAQ-142 – EA-18G – Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) – from Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash.
  • The “Bear Aces” of VAW-124 – E-2D – Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk, Va.
  • The “Rawhides” of VRC-40 – Detachment – C-2A – Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk.
  • The “Tridents” of HSC-9 – MH-60S – Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk.
  • The “Spartans” of HSM-70 – MH-60R – Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) – from Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla.

Cruiser

Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Michael Cameron pipes over the 1MC prior to an announcement aboard the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Normandy (CG-60) following the ship’s completion of Surface Warfare Advanced Tactical Training (SWATT) on Sept. 22, 2022. US Navy Photo

USS Normandy (CG-60), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.

Destroyer Squadron 2

Destroyer Squadron 26 is based in Norfolk and is embarked on the carrier. The following ships deployed with the strike group.

  • USS Thomas Hudner (DDG-116), homeported at Naval Station Mayport, Fla.
  • USS Ramage (DDG-61), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.
  • USS McFaul (DDG-74), homeported at Naval Station Mayport.

The CSG also includes the fleet logistics ship: USCGC Hamilton (WMSL-753), USNS Robert E. Peary (T-AKE-5) and USNS Joshua Humphreys (T-AO-188).

In the Eastern Pacific

USS Chung-Hoon (DDG-93) passes aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN-68) as it transits through the San Diego Harbor on Sept. 23, 2022. US Navy Photo

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) left San Diego on Sunday to resume training in the Southern California Operating Areas. This past week, Strike Group Units have been conducting Surface Warfare Advanced Tactical Training (SWATT) events while Nimitz dealt with potable water contamination issues. With the carrier back underway, the CSG can now embark its Air Wing and conduct its Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX).

Nimitz departed its homeport in Bremerton on Sep 13 to sail to San Diego; the crew discovered aviation fuel in the ship’s system on Sep 16, USNI News previously reported.

Carrier Strike Group 11

Quartermaster 2nd Class Robert Staab, from Manitowoc, Wis., points out a navigational aid as the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN-68) on Oct. 2, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier

  • USS Nimitz (CVN-68), homeported in Bremerton, Wash.

Carrier Air Wing 17

An E-2C Hawkeye, from the ‘Sun Kings’ of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 116 makes an arrested landing on the flight deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN-68) on Oct. 2, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17, based at Naval Air Station Lemoore, Calif., will be embarked aboard Nimitz for COMPTUEX and includes a total of nine squadrons and detachments:

  • The “Fighting Redcocks” of VFA-22 Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) flying F/A-18Fs from Naval Air Station Lemoore, Calif.
  • The “Mighty Shrikes” of VFA-94 – F/A-18F – from Naval Air Station Lemoore.
  • The “Kestrels” of VFA-137 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Lemoore.
  • The “Blue Diamonds” of VFA 146 – from Naval Air Station Lemoore.
  • The “Cougars” of VAQ-139 – EA-18G – Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) – from Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash.
  • The “Sun Kings” of VAW-116 – E-2D – Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) – from Naval Air Station Point Mugu, Calif.
  • The “Providers” of VRC-30 – C-2A – Fleet Logistics Multi-Mission Squadron (VRM) – from Naval Air Station North Island, Calif.
  • The “Indians” of HSC-6 – MH-60S – Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) – from Naval Air Station North Island.
  • The “BattleCats” of HSM-73 – MH-60R – Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) – from Naval Air Station North Island.

Cruiser

USS John Finn (DDG-113), USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG-108), USS Chung Hoon (DDG-93) and Ticonderoga-Class guided missile cruiser USS Bunker Hill (CG-52) sail in formation on Sept. 30, 2022. US Navy Photo

 

  • USS Bunker Hill (CG-52), homeported at Naval Station San Diego, Calif.

Destroyer Squadron 9

Boatswains Mate Seaman Dexter Drapiza , from Norwalk Calif., left, Fire Controlman 2nd Class Khaliq Marable, from Dayton Ohio, Center and Boatswain Mate 3rd Class Tony Williams, from Jacksonville Fl., keep the USS John Finn (DDG-113) on course on Sept. 30, 2022. US Navy Photo

Destroyer Squadron 9 is based in Everett, Wash., and is embarked on Nimitz.

  • USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG- 108), homeported at Naval Station Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
  • USS Chung-Hoon (DDG-93) homeported at Naval Station Pearl Harbor.
  • USS John Finn (DDG-113) homeported at Naval Station San Diego.

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) is training in the Southern California Operating Areas.

In addition to these major formations, not shown are others serving in submarines, individual surface ships, aircraft squadrons, SEALs, Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Forces, Seabees, Coast Guard cutters, EOD Mobile Units and more serving throughout the globe.

USNI News Fleet and Marine Tracker: Sept. 26, 2022

These are the approximate positions of the U.S. Navy’s deployed carrier strike groups and amphibious ready groups throughout the world as of Sept. 26, 2022, based on Navy and public data. In cases where a CSG or ARG is conducting disaggregated operations, the chart reflects the location of the capital ship. Ships Underway Total Battle […]

USNI News Graphic

These are the approximate positions of the U.S. Navy’s deployed carrier strike groups and amphibious ready groups throughout the world as of Sept. 26, 2022, based on Navy and public data. In cases where a CSG or ARG is conducting disaggregated operations, the chart reflects the location of the capital ship.

Ships Underway

Total Battle Force Deployed Underway
300*
(USS 242, USNS 58)
*as of Sept. 21, 2022 per NVR
105
(USS 69, USNS 36)
 82
(60 Deployed, 22 Local)

Ships Deployed by Fleet

2nd Fleet 3rd Fleet 4th Fleet 5th Fleet 6th Fleet 7th Fleet Total
5 1 3 11 29 58 107

In the East China Sea

Republic of Korea (ROK) Navy Sailors wave ROK and U.S. flags during a port visit of USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) in Busan, Republic of Korea, Sept. 23, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), along with USS Chancellorsville (CG 62) and USS Barry (DDG 52), departed Busan, the Republic of Korea Monday morning local time after the Reagan made the first carrier port call to the country in nearly four years.

Aircraft carrier


Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), homeported in Yokosuka, Japan.

Carrier Air Wing 5

An MH-60S Knight Hawk, attached to the Golden Falcons of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 12, flies over the flight deck of USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), in the Philippine Sea on Sept. 22, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, based at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, is embarked aboard Ronald Reagan and includes a total of nine squadrons and detachments:

  • The “Royal Maces” of VFA-27 – Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) – from Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan.
  • The “Diamondbacks” of VFA-102 from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Eagles” of VFA-115 from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Dambusters” of VFA-195 from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Shadowhawks” of VAQ-141 – Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) – from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Tiger Tails” of VAW-125 – Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) – from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Providers” of VRC-30 – Detachment 5 – Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) – from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Golden Falcons” of HSC-12 – Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) – from Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Japan.
  • The “Saberhawks” of HSM-77 – Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) – from Naval Air Facility Atsugi.

Cruisers

Capt. Edward Angelinas and a South Korean Harbor Pilot oversee Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) pulling into Busan, Republic of Korea Navy Port on Sept. 23, 2022. US Navy Photo

 

 

  • USS Chancellorsville (CG-62), homeported in Yokosuka, Japan.

Destroyer Squadron 15

Operations Specialist 3rd Class Stewart Sanchez-Zamora, from Lagrange, Georgia, Operations Specialist 1st Class Rasha Urtecho, from Roseburg, Oregon and Operations Specialist 3rd Class Savannah Valdez, from San Diego monitor surface contacts from the pilothouse aboard Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Benfold (DDG-65) as the ship prepares to pull into Chinhae, Republic of Korea, Sept. 23, 2022. US Navy Photo

Destroyer Squadron 15 is based in Yokosuka, Japan, and is embarked on the carrier. Destroyers from Destroyer Squadron 15 are also assigned to the Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group.

  • USS Benfold (DDG-65), homeported in Yokosuka.
  • USS Barry (DDG-52), homeported in Yokosuka.

In Japan

USS America (LHA 6) sails toward the amphibious assault carrier USS Tripoli (LHA-7) during a formation steaming exercise while sailing in the East China Sea, on Sept. 17, 2022. US Navy Photo

Amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA-6) is in Sasebo, Japan.

In the South China Sea

Marine Cpl. Julian Larsen, a scout sniper with Battalion Landing Team 2/5, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, fires at a target during a night aerial live fire exercise in the Philippine Sea, Sept. 24, 2022. US Marine Corps Photo

Amphibious assault ship USS Tripoli (LHA-7) and embarked elements of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) are underway in the South China Sea.

Tripoli departed Naval Station San Diego, Calif., for an independent deployment to the Western Pacific on May 2.

Prior to embarking the 31st MEU, Tripoli had been operating under the “lightning carrier” concept, in which it had more than a dozen F-35Bs aboard during its Pacific deployment. The ship is underway with Marine MV-22B Ospreys and CH-53E Super Stallions for the remainder of its Indo-Pacific deployment.

Sailors assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 23 conduct a search and rescue swimmer training from USS Tripoli (LHA-7)on Sept. 22, 2022. US Navy Photo

 

Tripoli took part in the June Valiant Shield exercise but has transitioned to an amphibious ready force with the Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 262 (Reinforced) embarked. Since it began its deployment in May, Tripoli has also had a detachment of MH-60S Knight Hawks embarked from the “Wildcards” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 23.

In the Ionian Sea

Chief Warrant Officer 2 Enzo Gandolfo, assigned to the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77), gives a brief for a flight deck fire drill, Sep. 21, 2022. US Navy Photo

The George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group (CSG) remains on station in the Ionian Sea. The CSG left Norfolk, Va., on Aug. 10 and took over duties in U.S. 6th Fleet from the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group on Aug 28. U.S. 6th Fleet commander Vice Adm. Thomas Ishee visited USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77) and the staffs of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10 while the strike group was underway in the Adriatic Sea on Sept. 22. Ishee took command of 6th Fleet on Sept. 15.

Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 (SNMG 2) is also operating in the Mediterranean Sea. U.S. Navy Rear Adm. Scott Sciretta, who assumed command of the formation on July 1, is embarked aboard Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Forrest Sherman (DDG-98) as SNMG 2’s flagship. SNMG-2 ships are participating in NATO Exercise Dynamic Mariner through Sept. 22. Participating assets include five submarines, 50 surface vessels and five aircraft from 12 nations.

Carrier Strike Group 10

Vice Adm. Thomas Ishee, commander, U.S. 6th Fleet Operation Specialist 1st Class Spencer Bryant Sailors during a visit to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77) on Sept. 22, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier
USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77), homeported in Norfolk, Va.

Carrier Air Wing 7

Sailors assigned to the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77) participate in a flight deck fire drill on Sep. 21, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7, based on Naval Air Station Oceana, Va., is embarked on Bush and includes:

  • The “Pukin’ Dogs” of VFA-143 Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) flying F/A-18Es from Naval Air Station Oceana, Va.
  • The “Jolly Rogers” of VFA-103 – F/A-18F – from Naval Air Station Oceana.
  • The “Sidewinders” of VFA-86 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Lemoore, Calif.
  • The “Knighthawks” of VFA-136 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Lemoore.
  • The “Patriots” of VAQ-140 – EA-18G – Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) – from Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash.
  • The “Bluetails” of VAW-121 – E-2D – Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk, Va.
  • The “Rawhides” of VRC-40 – Detachment – C-2A – Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk.
  • The “Nightdippers” of HSC-5 – MH-60S – Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk.
  • The “Grandmasters” of HSM-46 – MH-60R – Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) – from Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla.

Cruiser

Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Kayla Morris, assigned to the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55), signals to the fast combat support ship USNS Arctic (T-AOE-8) during a replenishment-at-sea on Sept. 20, 2022. US Navy Photo

USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk, Va.

Destroyer Squadron 26

Seaman Kevin Castillo, assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Truxtun (DDG-103), maintains the king’s post, on Sept. 20, 2022. US Navy Photo

Destroyer Squadron 26 is based in Norfolk and is embarked on the carrier. The following ships deployed with the strike group.

  • USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), homeported at Naval Station Mayport, Fla.
  • USS Truxtun (DDG-103), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.
  • USS Farragut (DDG-99), homeported at Naval Station Mayport.
  • USS Nitze (DDG-94), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.

In the English Channel

A Marine AV-8B Harrier sits on the flight deck aboard the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD-3) as the ship approaches the Great Belt Bridge in the Danish Straits Sept. 22, 2022. US Navy Photo

The Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) and the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) have departed the Baltic Sea and are in the English Channel. The ARG includes USS Kearsarge (LHD-3), USS Arlington (LPD-24) and USS Gunston Hall (LSD-44). Kearsarge and Gunston Hall completed port calls in Gdynia and Gdansk, respectively, last week.

The 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit is based in North Carolina and includes the command element; the aviation combat element, Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron, 263 (Reinforced); the ground combat element, Battalion Landing Team 2/6; and the logistics combat element, Combat Logistics Battalion 26.

Boatswain’s 2nd Class Nelson Jiminian, right, and Boatswain’s Mate 2nd Class Cynthia Fowlerorozco, both assigned to the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD-3), stand watch as the ship transits the Danish Straits, Sept. 21, 2022. US Navy Photo

 

The Kearsarge ARG is commanded by Amphibious Squadron Six. Other Navy units in the ARG include Fleet Surgical Team 2, Tactical Air Control Squadron 22, Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 28, Assault Craft Unit 2, Assault Craft Unit 4, Naval Beach Group 2 and Beach Master Unit 2.

In the Western Atlantic

The shadow of an MH-60S Knight Hawk attached to the ‘Tridents’ of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 9 casts shadow on the island of USS Gerald R. Ford’s (CVN 78) during an ammunition onload on Sept. 25, 2022. US Navy Photo

USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) is underway in the Virginia Capes Operating Areas after leaving Norfolk, Va., on Sept. 16 ahead of an extended training cruise.

In the Eastern Pacific

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) sails in formation during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2022, July 28, 2022. US Navy Photo

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) is underway in the Southern California Operating Areas.

In addition to these major formations, not shown are others serving in submarines, individual surface ships, aircraft squadrons, SEALs, Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Forces, Seabees, Coast Guard cutters, EOD Mobile Units and more serving throughout the globe.

USNI News Fleet and Marine Tracker: Sept. 12, 2022

These are the approximate positions of the U.S. Navy’s deployed carrier strike groups and amphibious ready groups throughout the world as of Sept. 12, 2022, based on Navy and public data. In cases where a CSG or ARG is conducting disaggregated operations, the chart reflects the location of the capital ship. Ships Underway Total Battle […]

USNI News Graphic

These are the approximate positions of the U.S. Navy’s deployed carrier strike groups and amphibious ready groups throughout the world as of Sept. 12, 2022, based on Navy and public data. In cases where a CSG or ARG is conducting disaggregated operations, the chart reflects the location of the capital ship.

Ships Underway

Total Battle Force Deployed Underway
299
(USS 241, USNS 58)
107
(USS 71, USNS 36)
 66
(44 Deployed, 22 Local)

Ships Deployed by Fleet

2nd Fleet 3rd Fleet 4th Fleet 5th Fleet 6th Fleet 7th Fleet Total
0 1 6 11 29 59 106

In Sasebo, Japan

Amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA-6) is in port.

In the Philippine Sea

Sailors stand in formation for morning colors on the flight deck of the U.S. Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), while in port on board Commander, Fleet Activities Yokosuka on Sept. 11, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) is underway in the Philippine Sea after departing its homeport in Yokosuka, Japan, on Sept. 12, 2022. The Reagan Carrier Strike Group returned from a three-month patrol on Aug. 19, and was expected to begin its annual maintenance period.

Ronald Reagan is quickly back at sea thanks to the efforts of the ship’s sailors and the outstanding work from maintenance teams ashore,” the carrier’s skipper, Capt. Fred Goldhammer, said in a Sept. 12 statement provided to Stars and Stripes. “Our completion of scheduled maintenance ensures we remain ready and agile to respond at a moment’s notice.”

Aircraft carrier

USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), homeported in Yokosuka, Japan.

Carrier Air Wing 5

A U.S. Navy Northrop Grumman E-2 Advanced Hawkeye attached to Carrier Air Wing 5 returns to Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, August 17, 2022. US Marine Corps Photo

Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, based at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, is embarked aboard Ronald Reagan and includes a total of nine squadrons and detachments:

  • The “Royal Maces” of VFA-27 – Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) – from Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan.
  • The “Diamondbacks” of VFA-102 from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Eagles” of VFA-115 from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Dambusters” of VFA-195 from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Shadowhawks” of VAQ-141 – Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) – from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Tiger Tails” of VAW-125 – Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) – from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Providers” of VRC-30 – Detachment 5 – Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) – from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Golden Falcons” of HSC-12 – Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) – from Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Japan.
  • The “Saberhawks” of HSM-77 – Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) – from Naval Air Facility Atsugi.

Cruisers

Lt. Carlos Urquilla from Mooresville, North Carolina, stands watch in the combat information center aboard Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) in the Philippine Sea on Aug. 31, 2022. US Navy Photo

  • USS Chancellorsville (CG-62), homeported in Yokosuka, Japan.

Destroyer Squadron 15

Gunner’s Mate 1st Class George Thomas (left), from Rochester, New York, and Fire Controlman 2nd Class Dylan Shubin, from Norco, California, adjust the sights on a .50-caliber machine gun during a live-fire exercise aboard USS Barry (DDG-52) while operating in the Philippine Sea on Sept. 4, 2022. US Navy Photo

Destroyer Squadron 15 is based in Yokosuka, Japan, and is embarked on the carrier. Destroyers from Destroyer Squadron 15 are also assigned to the Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group.

  • USS Benfold (DDG-65), homeported in Yokosuka, Japan.
  • USS Barry (DDG-52), homeported in Yokosuka.

An F-35B Lightning II aircraft assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 262 (Reinforced) launches from amphibious assault carrier USS Tripoli (LHA-7) on Sept. 6, 2022. US Navy Photo

Amphibious assault ship USS Tripoli (LHA-7) and embarked elements of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) are underway in the Philippine Sea.

Tripoli departed Naval Station San Diego, Calif., for an independent deployment to the Western Pacific on May 2.

Prior to embarking the 31st MEUTripoli had been operating under the “lightning carrier” concept, in which it had more than a dozen F-35Bs aboard during its Pacific deployment. The ship is underway with Marine MV-22B Ospreys and CH-53E Super Stallions for the remainder of its Indo-Pacific deployment.

Tripoli took part in the June Valiant Shield exercise, but has transitioned to an amphibious ready force with the Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 262 (Reinforced) embarked. Since it began its deployment in May, Tripoli has also had a detachment of MH-60S Knighthawks embarked from the “Wildcards” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 23.

In the Ionian Sea

USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77), back, sails alongside the Orizzonte-class destroyer ITS Caio Duilio (D 554) during combined operations in the Adriatic Sea, Sep. 8, 2022. US Navy Photo

The George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group (CSG) remains on station in the Ionian Sea. The CSG left Norfolk, Va., on Aug. 10 and took over duties in U.S. 6th Fleet from the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group on Aug 28.

Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 (SNMG 2) is also operating in the Mediterranean Sea. U.S. Navy Rear Adm. Scott Sciretta, who assumed command of the formation on July 1, is embarked aboard Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Forrest Sherman (DDG-98) as SNMG 2’s flagship.

Carrier Strike Group 10

Sailors prepare for fire watch on the flight deck of USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77), Sep. 9, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier

USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77), homeported in Norfolk, Va.

Carrier Air Wing 1

Capt. Michael Hoskins, chief of staff, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10, George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group (GHWBCSG), prepares for a flight on an F/A-18F Super hornet aircraft, attached to the ‘Jolly Rogers’ of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 103, aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77), Sept. 9, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7, based on Naval Air Station Oceana, Va., is embarked on Bush and includes:

  • The “Pukin’ Dogs” of VFA-143 Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) flying F/A-18Es from Naval Air Station Oceana, Va.
  • The “Jolly Rogers” of VFA-103 – F/A-18F – from Naval Air Station Oceana.
  • The “Sidewinders” of VFA-86 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Lemoore, Calif.
  • The “Knighthawks” of VFA-136 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Lemoore.
  • The “Patriots” of VAQ-140 – EA-18G – Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) – from Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash.
  • The “Bluetails” of VAW-121 – E-2D – Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk, Va.
  • The “Rawhides” of VRC-40 – Detachment – C-2A – Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk.
  • The “Nightdippers” of HSC-5 – MH-60S – Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk.
  • The “Grandmasters” of HSM-46 – MH-60R – Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) – from Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla.

Cruiser

Boatswain’s Mate 2nd Class Ezequiel Cervantes, left, and Boatswain’s Mate Seaman Rayshaun Black, both assigned to the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55), demonstrate how to use a life preserver during abandon ship training, Sept. 3, 2022. US Navy Photo

USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.

Destroyer Squadron 26

Ens. John McCoy, assigned to guided-missile destroyer USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), stands watch as the ship transits the Bab al-Mandeb with the vehicle cargo ship USNS Seay (T-AKR-302), Sept. 9, 2022. US Navy Photo

Destroyer Squadron 26 is based in Norfolk and is embarked on the carrier. The following ships deployed with the strike group.

  • USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), homeported at Naval Station Mayport, Fla.
  • USS Truxtun (DDG-103), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk, Va.
  • USS Farragut (DDG-99), homeported at Naval Station Mayport.
  • USS Nitze (DDG-94), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.

In the Baltic Sea

U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps aircraft fly over the Portuguese Navy Vasco da Gama-class NRP Core-Real (F332), right, and U.S. Navy Whidbey Island-class dock landing ship USS Gunston Hall (LSD-44) on Sept. 4, 2022. US Navy Photo

The Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) and the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) are operating in the Baltic Sea. The ARG includes USS Kearsarge (LHD-3), USS Arlington (LPD-24) and USS Gunston Hall (LSD-44). Kearsarge and Arlington recently made port calls in Riga, Latvia and Visby, Sweden, respectively.

The 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit is based in North Carolina and includes the command element; the aviation combat element, Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron, 263 (Reinforced); the ground combat element, Battalion Landing Team 2/6; and the logistics combat element, Combat Logistics Battalion 26.

The Kearsarge ARG is commanded by Amphibious Squadron Six. Other Navy units in the ARG include Fleet Surgical Team 2, Tactical Air Control Squadron 22, Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 28, Assault Craft Unit 2, Assault Craft Unit 4, Naval Beach Group 2 and Beach Master Unit 2.

In Norfolk, Va.

Sailor assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Cole (DDG-67), embraces his family after returning to Naval Station Norfolk, Va., on Sept. 9, 2022. US Navy Photo

Most of the ships and squadrons of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group are back home after an extended deployment in Europe. The carrier itself will enter port in Norfolk this morning.

Carrier Air Wing 1 squadrons landed at their home fields on Sep 5. USS San Jacinto (CG-56) arrived in Norfolk Sep 8. USS Cole (DDG-67) and USS Bainbridge (DDG-96) arrived in Norfolk on Friday.

USS Jason Dunham (DDG-109) and USS Gravely (DDG-107) have already returned home to Naval Station Mayport, Fla., and Naval Station Norfolk, respectively. Jason Dunham arrived on June 26, while Gravely came home on June 24.

The Harry S. Truman CSG was in the Mediterranean for a nine-month deployment as part of U.S. support to NATO allies and as a hedge against Russian aggression since Moscow invaded Ukraine. While supporting U.S. European Command, Air Carrier Wing 1 flew more than 10,200 sorties, according to a Navy news release. During a March 2022 visit to Truman, while it was in the Mediterranean, USNI News learned that the air wing performed 60 to 90 sorties a day at that time.

USS Ross (DDG-71) returned to Norfolk Sept. 11 after serving nearly ten years in the Forward Deployed Naval Forces – Europe (FDNF-E). USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) replaced Ross in the FDNF-E in Rota, Spain.

Carrier Strike Group 8

The homeward bound pennant flies onboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), Sept. 9, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), homeported in Norfolk, Va.

Carrier Air Wing 1

‘Red Rippers’ of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 11 returned home to Naval Air Station Ocean, September 5. VFA-11, part of Carrier Air Wing 1, embarked on USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), returns to Naval Station Norfolk, Va., on Sept. 5, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1, based at Naval Air Station Oceana, Va., was embarked aboard Harry S. Truman and includes a total of nine squadrons and detachments. The air wing returned on Sept.5. :

  • The “Red Rippers” of VFA-11 Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) flying F/A-18Fs from Naval Air Station Oceana.
  • The “Fighting Checkmates” of VFA-211 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Oceana.
  • The “Blue Blasters” of VFA-34 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Oceana.
  • The “Sunliners” of VFA-81 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Oceana.
  • The “Rooks” of VAQ-137 – EA-18G – Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) – from Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash.
  • The “Seahawks” of VAW-126 – E-2D – Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk, Va.
  • The “Rawhides” of VRC-40 – Detachment – C-2A – Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk.
  • The “Dragon Slayers” of HSC-11 – MH-60S – Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk.
  • The “Proud Warriors” of HSM-72 – MH-60R – Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) – from Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla.

Cruiser

USS San Jacinto (CG-56) returns to Naval Station Norfolk after a regularly scheduled deployment in the U.S. 5th Fleet and U.S. 6th Fleet areas of operations, Sept. 8. US Navy Photo

USS San Jacinto (CG-56), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk. Returned on Sept. 8.

Destroyer Squadron 28

Rear Adm. Brian Davies, deputy commander of U.S. 2nd Fleet, speaks to the crew of the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Cole (DDG-67). US Navy Photo

Destroyer Squadron 28 is based in Norfolk and is embarked on the carrier. The following ships deployed with the strike group.

  • USS Cole (DDG-67), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk. Returned on Sept. 9.
  • USS Bainbridge (DDG- 96), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk. Returned on Sept. 9.
  • USS Gravely (DDG-107), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk. Returned on June, 8.
  • USS Jason Dunham (DDG-109), homeported at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. Returned on June, 26.
  • USS Gonzalez (DDG-66), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.

In the Western Atlantic

Air Traffic Controller 2nd Class Stephanie Florence, assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD-5) Air Department, parades the colors during a burial-at-sea ceremony in the ship’s hangar bay, Aug. 27, 2022. US Navy Photo

USS Bataan (LHD-5) is underway in the Virginia Capes Operating Areas.

In the Eastern Pacific

A landing craft, air cushion (LCAC) assigned to Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 5, prepares to enter the well deck of amphibious transport dock USS Anchorage (LPD-23), Sept. 6, 2022. US Navy Photo

The Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) is underway in the Southern California Operating Areas. USS Makin Island (LHD-8), flagship of Amphibious Squadron Seven, along with the 13th MEU, is currently underway conducting integrated training to prepare for an upcoming deployment.

In addition to these major formations, not shown are others serving in submarines, individual surface ships, aircraft squadrons, SEALs, Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Forces, Seabees, Coast Guard cutters, EOD Mobile Units and more serving throughout the globe.

USNI News Fleet and Marine Tracker: Sept. 8, 2022

These are the approximate positions of the U.S. Navy’s deployed carrier strike groups and amphibious ready groups throughout the world as of Sept. 8, 2022, based on Navy and public data. In cases where a CSG or ARG is conducting disaggregated operations, the chart reflects the location of the capital ship. Ships Underway Total Battle […]

USNI News Graphic

These are the approximate positions of the U.S. Navy’s deployed carrier strike groups and amphibious ready groups throughout the world as of Sept. 8, 2022, based on Navy and public data. In cases where a CSG or ARG is conducting disaggregated operations, the chart reflects the location of the capital ship.

Ships Underway

Total Battle Force Deployed Underway
299
(USS 241, USNS 58)
111
(USS 75, USNS 36)
 68
(47 Deployed, 21 Local)

Ships Deployed by Fleet

2nd Fleet 3rd Fleet 4th Fleet 5th Fleet 6th Fleet 7th Fleet Total
5 1 3 11 29 59 108

In Yokosuka, Japan

Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Tyler Helm, from St. Louis, conducts maintenance on USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) on Sept. 2, 2022. US Navy Photo

The Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group (CSG) is at its homeport in Japan.

In the Philippine Sea

Boatswain’s Mate 2nd Class Amara Alcorn, from Oshkosh, Wis., assigned to USS America (LHA-6), releases a fuel line during a fueling-at-sea with the amphibious dock landing ship USS Rushmore (LSD-47) in the East China Sea on Sept. 6, 2022. US Navy Photo

USS America (LHA-6) is underway in the Philippine Sea.

In the Singapore Strait

Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) Airman Nevyn Harris, from Great Mills, Maryland, moves as an F-35B Lighting II aircraft assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 262 (Reinforced) launches from amphibious assault carrier USS Tripoli (LHA-7) on Sept. 7, 2022. US Navy Photo

Amphibious assault ship USS Tripoli (LHA-7) just completed a port call in Singapore. Tripoli and elements of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) are underway in the Singapore Strait.

Tripoli departed Naval Station San Diego, Calif., for an independent deployment to the Western Pacific on May 2.

Prior to embarking the 31st MEUTripoli had been operating under the “lightning carrier” concept, in which it had more than a dozen F-35Bs aboard during its Pacific deployment. The ship is underway with Marine MV-22B Ospreys and CH-53E Super Stallions for the remainder of its Indo-Pacific deployment.

Tripoli took part in the June Valiant Shield exercise but has transitioned to an amphibious ready force with the Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 262 (Reinforced) embarked. Since it began its deployment in May, Tripoli has also had a detachment of MH-60S Knight Hawks embarked from the “Wildcards” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 23.

In the Ionian Sea

USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77), transits the Adriatic Sea alongside the Italian training ship ITS Amerigo Vespucci, Sep. 1, 2022. US Navy Photo

The George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group (CSG) is in the Ionian Sea. The CSG left Norfolk, Va., on Aug. 10 and took over duties in U.S. 6th Fleet from the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group on Aug 28.

Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 (SNMG 2) is also operating in the Mediterranean Sea. U.S. Navy Rear Adm. Scott Sciretta, who assumed command of the formation on July 1, is embarked aboard Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Forrest Sherman (DDG-98) as SNMG 2’s flagship.

Carrier Strike Group 10

Cmdr. Thomas Van Hoozer, assigned to Helicopter Strike Squadron (HSC) 5, left, is wetted down after his last flight as commanding officer during a change of command ceremony, Sep. 1, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier
USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77), homeported in Norfolk, Va.

Carrier Air Wing 1

An F/A-18E Super Hornet aircraft, attached to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 103, launches from the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77), Aug. 29, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7, based on Naval Air Station Oceana, Va., is embarked on Bush and includes:

  • The “Pukin’ Dogs” of VFA-143 Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) flying F/A-18Es from Naval Air Station Oceana, Va.
  • The “Jolly Rogers” of VFA-103 – F/A-18F – from Naval Air Station Oceana.
  • The “Sidewinders” of VFA-86 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Lemoore, Calif.
  • The “Knighthawks” of VFA-136 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Lemoore.
  • The “Patriots” of VAQ-140 – EA-18G – Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) – from Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash.
  • The “Bluetails” of VAW-121 – E-2D – Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk, Va.
  • The “Rawhides” of VRC-40 – Detachment – C-2A – Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk.
  • The “Nightdippers” of HSC-5 – MH-60S – Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk.
  • The “Grandmasters” of HSM-46 – MH-60R – Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) – from Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla.

Cruiser

USS San Jacinto (CG-56) sails with the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55), Aug. 27, 2022. US Navy Photo

USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.

Destroyer Squadron 26

Seaman Desmond Sanchez, assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), heaves a line during small boat operations in the Red Sea, Sept. 2, 2022. US Navy Photo

Destroyer Squadron 26 is based in Norfolk and is embarked on the carrier. The following ships deployed with the strike group.

  • USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), homeported at Naval Station Mayport, Fla.
  • USS Truxtun (DDG-103), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk, Va.
  • USS Farragut (DDG-99), homeported at Naval Station Mayport.
  • USS Nitze (DDG-94), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.

In Riga, Latvia; Visby, Sweden

Navy and Marine Corps aircraft fly over the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD-3), during a maneuvering exercise with allied ships in the Baltic Sea, Sept. 4, 2022. US Navy Photo

The Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) and the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) have been operating in the Baltic Sea. The ARG includes USS Kearsarge (LHD-3), USS Arlington (LPD-24) and USS Gunston Hall (LSD-44). Kearsarge arrived in Riga, Latvia, on Sept. 6.  Arlington arrived in Visby, Sweden, on Sept. 6.

According to the Navy, last week, the Kearsarge ARG-MEU, participated in a bilateral training opportunity with Swedish Armed Forces where maritime and amphibious operations were conducted to maintain unit readiness as a cohesive partnering force. The ARG-MEU and Swedish forces held amphibious operations, a raid in Ravlunda, Sweden, and an airfield seizure ashore.

From left, the Norwegian Fridtjof Nansen-class frigate HNoMS Roald Amundsen (F331), the U.S. Navy San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS Arlington (LPD-24), the Norwegian replenishment oiler HNoMS Maud (A530), USS Kearsarge (LHD-3), the Portuguese Vasco Da Gama-class frigate NRP Corte-Real (F332), the Royal Netherlands Navy multi-mission support ship HNLMS Karel Doorman (A 833), USS Gunston Hall (LSD-44) and the U.S. Navy Arleigh Burke-class destroyer USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117), sail in formation on Sept. 4, 2022. US Navy Photo

The 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit is based in North Carolina and includes the command element; the aviation combat element, Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron, 263 (Reinforced); the ground combat element, Battalion Landing Team 2/6; and the logistics combat element, Combat Logistics Battalion 26.

The Kearsarge ARG is commanded by Amphibious Squadron Six. Other Navy units in the ARG include Fleet Surgical Team 2, Tactical Air Control Squadron 22, Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 28, Assault Craft Unit 2, Assault Craft Unit 4, Naval Beach Group 2 and Beach Master Unit 2.

In the Western Atlantic

Families welcome home sailors attached to the ‘Dragon Slayers’ of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 11 on Naval Station Norfolk during the squadron’s homecoming on Sept. 7, 2022. US Navy Photo

Ships and squadrons of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (CSG) are returning home after a more than nine-month deployment — mostly in the Mediterranean Sea.

Carrier Air Wing 1 squadrons landed at their home fields on Monday. USS San Jacinto (CG-56) is expected arrive in Norfolk today. USS Cole (DDG-67), USS Bainbridge (DDG- 96) and USS Gonzalez (DDG-66), all part of Destroyer Squadron 28, are still at sea. Truman is also still in the Atlantic Ocean but is expected to pull into Norfolk in the coming days.

USS Jason Dunham (DDG-109) and USS Gravely (DDG-107) have already returned home to Naval Station Mayport, Fla., and Naval Station Norfolk, respectively. Jason Dunham arrived on June 26, while Gravely came home on June 24.

The Harry S. Truman CSG was in the Mediterranean for a nine-month deployment as part of the U.S. support of NATO allies and as a hedge against Russian aggression since Moscow invaded Ukraine. While supporting U.S. European Command, Air Carrier Wing 1 flew more than 10,200 sorties, according to the release. During a March 2022 visit to Truman, while it was in the Mediterranean, USNI News learned that the air wing performed 60 to 90 sorties a day, at the time.

Carrier Strike Group 8

Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Equipment) 3rd Class Joshua Ayala Aviles, from Canovanas, Puerto Rico, observes an F/A-18E Super Hornet, attached to the ‘Blue Blasters’ of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 34, launch from the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), during a Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 fly off, Sept. 5, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier
USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), homeported in Norfolk, Va.

Carrier Air Wing 1

Sailors attached to the ‘Seahawks’ of Airborne Command and Control Squadron (VAW) 126 return Naval Station Norfolk, Va., during the squadron’s homecoming on Sept. 5, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1, based at Naval Air Station Oceana, Va., was embarked aboard Harry S. Truman and includes a total of nine squadrons and detachments. The air wing returned this week:

  • The “Red Rippers” of VFA-11 Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) flying F/A-18Fs from Naval Air Station Oceana.
  • The “Fighting Checkmates” of VFA-211 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Oceana.
  • The “Blue Blasters” of VFA-34 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Oceana.
  • The “Sunliners” of VFA-81 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Oceana.
  • The “Rooks” of VAQ-137 – EA-18G – Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) – from Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash.
  • The “Seahawks” of VAW-126 – E-2D – Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk, Va.
  • The “Rawhides” of VRC-40 – Detachment – C-2A – Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk.
  • The “Dragon Slayers” of HSC-11 – MH-60S – Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk.
  • The “Proud Warriors” of HSM-72 – MH-60R – Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) – from Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla.

Cruiser

USS San Jacinto (CG-56), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.

Destroyer Squadron 28

Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Mechanical) 3rd Class Nahomy Garcia Murcia, from Palmdale, California, demonstrates locking the port shaft during an engineering propulsion limiting drill aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Bainbridge (DDG-96) in the Atlantic Ocean, Aug. 29, 2022. US Navy Photo

Destroyer Squadron 28 is based in Norfolk and is embarked on the carrier. The following ships deployed with the strike group.

  • USS Cole (DDG-67), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.
  • USS Bainbridge (DDG- 96), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.
  • USS Gravely (DDG-107), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.
  • USS Jason Dunham (DDG-109), homeported at Naval Station Mayport, Fla.
  • USS Gonzalez (DDG-66), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.

In addition to these major formations, not shown are others serving in submarines, individual surface ships, aircraft squadrons, SEALs, Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Forces, Seabees, Coast Guard cutters, EOD Mobile Units and more serving throughout the globe.

USNI News Fleet and Marine Tracker: Aug. 29, 2022

These are the approximate positions of the U.S. Navy’s deployed carrier strike groups and amphibious ready groups throughout the world as of Aug. 29, 2022, based on Navy and public data. In cases where a CSG or ARG is conducting disaggregated operations, the chart reflects the location of the capital ship. Ships Underway Total Battle […]

USNI News Image

These are the approximate positions of the U.S. Navy’s deployed carrier strike groups and amphibious ready groups throughout the world as of Aug. 29, 2022, based on Navy and public data. In cases where a CSG or ARG is conducting disaggregated operations, the chart reflects the location of the capital ship.

Ships Underway

Total Battle Force Deployed Underway
299
(USS 241, USNS 58)
115
(USS 78, USNS 37)
 72
(52 Deployed, 13Local)

Ships Deployed by Fleet

2nd Fleet 3rd Fleet 4th Fleet 5th Fleet 6th Fleet 7th Fleet Total
3 5 3 11 36 57 115

In Japan

Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Marissa Givens, from Atlanta, Ga., assigned to USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), climbs Mount Fuji, Japan. US Marine Corps Photo

The Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group (CSG) is at its homeport in Japan.

In the Philippine Sea

Interior Communications Electrician 3rd Class Hayden Bushy, from Ithaca, Michigan, assigned to the forward-deployed amphibious assault carrier USS America (LHA-6) on Aug. 27, 2022. US Navy Photo

USS America (LHA-6) is underway in the Philippine Sea.

In the South China Sea

An F-35B Lightning II aircraft assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 262 (Reinforced) launches from amphibious assault carrier USS Tripoli (LHA 7), Aug. 24, 2022. US Navy Photo

Amphibious assault ship USS Tripoli (LHA-7) and elements of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit are underway in the South China Sea.

Tripoli departed Naval Station San Diego, Calif., for an independent deployment to the Western Pacific on May 2. The 45,000-ton big-deck amphibious ship has 20 F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighters embarked to evaluate the Marines’ “lightning carrier” concept. The Navy and Marine Corps are testing Tripoli’s adjunct capability to a carrier strike group, USNI News previously reported.

In the Ionian Sea

USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77), front, receives ammunition from the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), Aug. 27, 2022. US Navy Photo

The George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group (CSG) is in the Ionian Sea after entering the Mediterranean Sea. The CSG left Norfolk, Va., on Aug. 10 and turned over duties in U.S. 6th Fleet with the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group on Sunday.

Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 (SNMG 2) is also operating in the Mediterranean Sea. U.S. Navy Rear Adm. Scott Sciretta, who assumed command of the formation on July 1, is embarked aboard Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Forrest Sherman (DDG-98) as SNMG 2’s flagship.

Other ships of SNMG2 include Italian Navy Bergamini FREMM-class guided-missile frigate ITS Martinengo (F 596), Italian Navy Logistic support ship LSS Vulcano (A 5335), Turkish Navy Barbaros-class frigate TCG Kemalreis (F-247), German Navy Berlin-class replenishment ship FGS Bonn (A1413), Spanish Navy F100-class air defense frigate ESPS Almirante Juan De Borbón (F-102), French Navy Aquitaine-class frigate FS Provence (D-652) and Hellenic Navy Ellie-class frigate HS Kountouriotis (F-462).

Carrier Strike Group 8

Rear Adm. Paul Spedero Jr., commander, Carrier Strike Group 8, prepares to board an MH-60S Knight Hawk helicopter, attached to the ‘Night Dippers’ of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 5, to visit USS George H. W. Bush (CVN-77), during a vertical replenishment, Aug. 27, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier
USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), homeported in Norfolk, Va.

Carrier Air Wing 1

An F/A-18E Super Hornet, attached to the ‘Fighting Checkmates’ of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 211, launches from the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) on Aug. 24, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1, based at Naval Air Station Oceana, Va., is embarked aboard Harry S. Truman and includes a total of nine squadrons and detachments:

  • The “Red Rippers” of VFA-11 Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) flying F/A-18Fs from Naval Air Station Oceana.
  • The “Fighting Checkmates” of VFA-211 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Oceana.
  • The “Blue Blasters” of VFA-34 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Oceana.
  • The “Sunliners” of VFA-81 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Oceana.
  • The “Rooks” of VAQ-137 – EA-18G – Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) – from Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash.
  • The “Seahawks” of VAW-126 – E-2D – Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk, Va.
  • The “Rawhides” of VRC-40 – Detachment – C-2A – Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk.
  • The “Dragon Slayers” of HSC-11 – MH-60S – Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk.
  • The “Proud Warriors” of HSM-72 – MH-60R – Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) – from Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla.

Cruiser

Hull Maintenance Technician 3rd Class Trent Gallagher, from Nahant, Massachusetts, uses a plasma cutter to fabricate a hinge in the general workshop aboard the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS San Jacinto (CG-56) in the Mediterranean Sea on Aug. 16, 2022. US Navy Photo

USS San Jacinto (CG-56), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.

Destroyer Squadron 28

Sailors hold a phone-and-distance line on the fo’c’sle aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Bainbridge (DDG-96) during a replenishment-at-sea with the Supply-class fast combat support ship USNS Arctic (T-AOE-8) in the Atlantic Ocean on Aug. 25, 2022. US Navy Photo

Destroyer Squadron 28 is based in Norfolk and is embarked on the carrier. The following ships deployed with the strike group.

  • USS Cole (DDG-67), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.
  • USS Bainbridge (DDG- 96), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.
  • USS Gravely (DDG-107), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.
  • USS Jason Dunham (DDG-109), homeported at Naval Station Mayport, Fla.
  • USS Gonzalez (DDG-66), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.
  • Royal Norwegian Navy frigate HNoMS Fridtjof Nansen (F310).

In the Mediterranean Sea

Sailors huddle on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) before a vertical replenishment with the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H. W. Bush (CVN-77) on Aug. 27, 2022. US Navy Photo

The Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group CSG has been operating in U.S. 6th Fleet since December and is underway in the Western Mediterranean Sea – headed home. The CSG’s deployment was extended to increase presence in the European theater due to the Russia-Ukraine conflict.

Carrier Strike Group 10

USS George H. W. Bush (CVN-77) transits alongside the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) during a vertical replenishment on Aug. 27, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier
USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77), homeported in Norfolk, Va.

Carrier Air Wing 1

An E-2D Hawkeye, attached to the ‘Seahawks’ of Airborne Command and Control Squadron (VAW) 126, flies over the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), Aug. 24, 2022. US Navy Photo

Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7, based on Naval Air Station Oceana, Va., is embarked on Bush and includes:

  • The “Pukin’ Dogs” of VFA-143 Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) flying F/A-18Es from Naval Air Station Oceana, Va.
  • The “Jolly Rogers” of VFA-103 – F/A-18F – from Naval Air Station Oceana.
  • The “Sidewinders” of VFA-86 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Lemoore, Calif.
  • The “Knighthawks” of VFA-136 – F/A-18E – from Naval Air Station Lemoore.
  • The “Patriots” of VAQ-140 – EA-18G – Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) – from Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash.
  • The “Bluetails” of VAW-121 – E-2D – Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk, Va.
  • The “Rawhides” of VRC-40 – Detachment – C-2A – Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk.
  • The “Nightdippers” of HSC-5 – MH-60S – Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) – from Naval Air Station Norfolk.
  • The “Grandmasters” of HSM-46 – MH-60R – Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) – from Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla.

Cruiser

Quartermaster Seaman Ryanne Banda, assigned to the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55), stands watch on the bridge wing as the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group enters the Mediterranean Sea, Aug. 25, 2022. The GHWBCSG is comprised of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 26, the Information Warfare Commander, and the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55). US Navy Photo

USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.

Destroyer Squadron 26

Sailors heave mooring lines aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG-94) in preparation for a sustainment and logistics port visit in Djibouti on Aug. 28, 2022. US Navy Photo

Destroyer Squadron 26 is based in Norfolk and is embarked on the carrier.

  • USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), homeported at Naval Station Mayport, Fla.
  • USS Truxtun (DDG-103), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk, Va.
  • USS Farragut (DDG-99), homeported at Naval Station Mayport.
  • USS Nitze (DDG-94), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.

In the Western Atlantic

Sailors assigned to the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD-5) prepare to take in supplies in the ship’s hangar bay during a replenishment-at-sea on Aug. 4, 2022. US Navy Photo

USS Bataan (LHD-5) got underway Aug. 22 and is operating in the Western Atlantic.

In addition to these major formations, not shown are others serving in submarines, individual surface ships, aircraft squadrons, SEALs, Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Forces, Seabees, Coast Guard cutters, EOD Mobile Units, and more serving throughout the globe.

Reagan Carrier Strike Group Wraps Spring Patrol Following Chinese Military Drills Near Taiwan

USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) pulled into Yokosuka, Japan on Friday, wrapping a three-month patrol in the Western Pacific, USNI News has learned. USNI News confirmed ship spotter reports that the carrier had returned to its Japan homeport. The forward-deployed carrier will now start its annual maintenance period at Fleet Activities Yokosuka, a Navy official confirmed […]

Sailors on the bridge wing of Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) observe a replenishment-at-sea between the USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) and USNS Rappahannock (T-AO-204) in the Philippine Sea on Aug. 12, 2022. US Navy Photo

USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) pulled into Yokosuka, Japan on Friday, wrapping a three-month patrol in the Western Pacific, USNI News has learned.

USNI News confirmed ship spotter reports that the carrier had returned to its Japan homeport. The forward-deployed carrier will now start its annual maintenance period at Fleet Activities Yokosuka, a Navy official confirmed to USNI News.

After departing for its patrol on May 20, Reagan was active in the Philippine and South China seas during its three months underway, according to the USNI News Fleet and Marine Tracker.

In mid-June Reagan and Carrier Strike Group 5 linked up with carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and amphibious assault ship USS Tripoli (LHA-7) for the American exercise Valiant Shield near Guam. Following the drills, Reagan entered the South China Sea in July. The carrier made a port call in Singapore on July 22 – the first for the carrier since 2019.

Following the port visit, Reagan made a swift transit across the South China Sea and took up station along with Tripoli at the western edge of the Philippine Sea ahead of U.S. House Speaker Rep. Nancy Pelosi’s (D-Calif.) visit to Taiwan in early August.

Following Pelosi’s visit, the Chinese military kicked off a provocative series of air and naval drills near Taiwan. Tripoli and Reagan stayed on station as the drills progressed.

Reagan will now start its annual maintenance period. Unlike carriers based in the U.S. that deploy on the 36-month Optimized Fleet Response Plan cycle, Reagan has a yearly repair period and typically goes on two three-month patrols each year.

The following is the composition of the Strike Group when it embarked on its patrol.

Carrier Strike Group 5

Aircraft carrier

USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), homeported in Yokosuka, Japan.

Carrier Air Wing 5

Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, based at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, is embarked aboard Ronald Reagan and includes a total of nine squadrons and detachments:

  • The “Royal Maces” of VFA-27 – Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) – from Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan.
  • The “Diamondbacks” of VFA-102 from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Eagles” of VFA-115 from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Dambusters” of VFA-195 from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Shadowhawks” of VAQ-141 – Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) – from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Tiger Tails” of VAW-125 – Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) – from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Providers” of VRC-30 – Detachment 5 – Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) – from MCAS Iwakuni.
  • The “Golden Falcons” of HSC-12 – Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) – from Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Japan.
  • The “Saberhawks” of HSM-77 – Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) – from Naval Air Facility Atsugi.

Cruiser

USS Antietam (CG-54), homeported in Yokosuka, Japan.

Destroyer Squadron 15

Destroyer Squadron 15 is based in Yokosuka, Japan, and is embarked on the carrier.

  • USS Benfold (DDG-65), homeported in Yokosuka, Japan.

USS Abraham Lincoln Return Marks End of Second High-Tempo Carrier Deployment in WESTPAC

ABOARD AIRCRAFT CARRIER USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN, OFF THE COAST OF HAWAII – When aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulls into Naval Air Station North Island on Thursday, it will cap off a busy deployment to the Western Pacific. Lincoln’s deployment saw the carrier largely operating in U.S. 7th Fleet, where it had the chance […]

An F-35C Lightning II, assigned to the ‘Black Knights’ of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 314, flies over USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on July 30, 2022. US Navy Photo

ABOARD AIRCRAFT CARRIER USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN, OFF THE COAST OF HAWAII – When aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulls into Naval Air Station North Island on Thursday, it will cap off a busy deployment to the Western Pacific.

Lincoln’s deployment saw the carrier largely operating in U.S. 7th Fleet, where it had the chance to drill with both Japan and the Philippines ahead of the biennial Rim of the Pacific 2022 exercise in Hawaii.

It’s the second consecutive high operational tempo aircraft carrier deployment to WESTPAC, as the U.S. Navy increases its emphasis on operating in the region to counter China.

“Our activities into the South China Sea as well as East China Sea were important to send a signal to China, North Korea, Russia of our commitment to the region, as well as our willingness to fly, sail, or operate wherever international law allows,” Rear Adm. J.T. Anderson, the commander of Carrier Strike Group Three, told USNI news in a recent interview.

While the carrier participated in a wide range of exercises, the deployment also marked the first U.S. Marine Corps F-35C Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter squadron deployment on an aircraft carrier and the second for the CMV-22B Osprey.

Capt. Amy Bauernschmidt, Lincoln’s commanding officer, told USNI News that the crew applied many of the takeaways from USS Carl Vinson‘s (CVN-70) recent deployment in the region to Lincoln’s time in WESTPAC.

“We took onboard a lot of their lessons about … where to base, and how to operate. We did build upon those lessons and learned a few of our own. We were fairly fortunate in that while we covered a vast amount of space in 7th fleet – some days it was a long flight for the CODSPREY – but we were able to remain mostly based out of one location for most of the deployment, which at least facilitated the flow of people and parts to one location,” Bauernschmidt said.

Dynamic Environment

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) sails in formation during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2022, July 28, 2022. US Navy Photo

The early days of Lincoln’s deployment saw the carrier operating in the South China Sea – including amid People’s Liberation Army Air Force incursions into Taiwan’s air defense identification zone – and the Philippine Sea.

Anderson echoed remarks Vinson crew members made to USNI News during a trip earlier this year to Vinson at the tail-end of its deployment, in which sailors described a more dynamic environment in U.S. 7th Fleet compared to deployments over the last two decades in U.S. Central Command.

“We spent a lot of time maneuvering around not only the Philippine Sea, but also in the South China Sea and well as the East China Sea. And the dynamic maneuver wasn’t just exclusively maneuvering around to avoid certain things, but it was also that that’s our best way of being able to compete in that space, as well as provide a strong presence throughout the region,” Anderson said.
“If we were to just simply maintain our location in one general location, I don’t think we were necessarily doing our job, right, in terms of providing a sustained presence throughout the region.”

Bauernschmidt acknowledged the difference between operations in U.S. 7th Fleet versus U.S. 5th Fleet.

“I would say a vast majority of folks that have deployed in the Navy got very comfortable and used to 5th Fleet operations and this is obviously not 5th Fleet operations. And so it is a much larger area than we would typically operate in and … it’s not just about one entity. It’s about China, Russia, [North] Korea. It’s about multiple different actors and being able to respond to any of those,” she told USNI News.
“Because it’s a large area of operations, being able to strategically place yourself to answer whatever mission we’re called upon is very important.”

Because of the size of the Indo-Pacific region, Bauernschmidt said she had to change how she thought about the carrier’s operations.

“I personally also had to think a little differently about each and every night what the sea space looked like, what we were being tasked with, what we were being asked to accomplish, or to just think ahead about where we may want to position ourselves in the event we were tasked with a different mission,” she said.
“Because unlike operations in the 5th Fleet that you can get where you needed to be in a half a day, in a fairly short amount of time, we have a lot more sea space to cover. And so being able to think strategically, position yourself where you need to be, understand the constraints and the restraints of ourselves, our aircraft, and other forces was important.” 

Lessons Learned from Vinson

An F/A-18E Super Hornet, assigned to the ‘Tophatters’ of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 14, prepares to make an arrested landing on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on June 3, 2022. US Navy Photo

Lincoln’s deployment to the western Pacific followed a similar one last year by Vinson, which sent the first U.S. Navy F-35C squadron and CMV-22B Osprey squadron out to sea. Lincoln deployed with 10 Marine Corps F-35Cs that make up the “Black Knights” of Marine Strike Fighter Squadron (VMFA) 314 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif.

Ahead of the deployment, Bauernschmidt said Lincoln had the authority to install a double-decker mezzanine at the back of the hangar bay.

“What that allowed us to do was get some of the material that was normally in hangar bay 3 up into that mezzanine,” she said.

“We also took a good look at all of the support equipment and really tried to optimize where maybe we had duplicates, or we had the ability to truly ensure that the support equipment for the aircraft that we had was the right quantity, the right number, and the right ability,” Bauernschmidt added.

Instead of basing out of the U.S. Air Force’s Kadena Air Base on Okinawa, like Vinson’s CMV-22B Osprey detachment, Lincoln’s detachment was based out of Marine Corps Air Station Futenma. This helped with parts and maintenance because the U.S. Marine Corps’s MV-22B Ospreys were also at Futenma.

“It is always helpful when there’s extra bodies, extra parts. So there was a little bit easier flow because there was already an established flow for most of their parts,” Bauernschmidt said.

Cmdr. Daniel Hutton, an aircraft intermediate maintenance department officer aboard Lincoln, said the carrier’s crew used takeaways from the Vinson deployment to tweak what equipment Lincoln brought. This allowed the crew to make more space in the hangar bay and be more strategic with what equipment it needed or did not need. As a result, the crew placed more gear in hangar bay 3, which made for more space in the middle of the carrier and in the forward part of the ship.

“Being the second air wing ship team to go out to sea with that type of aircraft, there’s a constant learning process that takes place between the ship, the supporting entities ashore, and then being able to adjust and take into account what things break,” Hutton told USNI News.

Hutton said they will continue to make tweaks depending on what happens throughout the deployment.

Since Vinson‘s crew had the chance to test out the deck density aboard the carrier with the Navy F-35Cs and the CMV-22B Ospreys, Lincoln could take those lessons and alter what they brought to sea. As a result, Bauernschmidt said Lincoln decreased its deck density.

An CMV-22B Osprey, carrying the U.S. ambassador to Japan, Hon. Rahm Emanuel, Japan Minister of Foreign Affairs, Hayashi Yoshima, Commander, U.S. 7th Fleet, Vice Adm. Karl Thomas, Commander, Navy Region Japan/Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Japan Rear Adm. Carl Lahti, lands on Naval Air Facility (NAF) Atsugi following an official visit, to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on April 23, 2022. US Navy Photo

“Because we had a lot of Vinson’s lessons learned, we were able to sit down and take a very thoughtful look at how we were utilizing space in the hangar bay to try to ensure that we didn’t have anything we didn’t need, but we did have everything that we were going to need so that it opened up extra space for aircraft and a little bit of extra maneuver space to maneuver them around,” she said.
“And we got our deck density down quite a bit from where Vinson was and into a pretty good place. And then we were still able to provide a little bit more feedback for follow on carriers so that they can learn from what we kind of figured out as well.”

Bauernschmidt said she also took advice from Vinson‘s commanding officer about how to perform replenishments at sea to maximize the carrier’s ability to respond to missions if necessary.

“He talked about some of the pluses and minuses with different locations – impacts of sea space, or how flight operations worked. We try to ensure that we were postured very well to be able to react to anything that we needed to react, like we do every day,” Bauernschmidt said. “But when you’re alongside another ship, we were very careful about planning it so that we were – several times we launched aircraft while we were alongside replenishing to be able to respond as necessary and then we were able to continue about the mission.”

F-35C Operations

Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Equipment) 2nd Class Justin Mancha, from San Antonio, signals an F-35C Lightning II, assigned to the ‘Black Knights’ of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 314, as it takes off from the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2022 on July 14, 2022. US Navy Photo

After employing the Navy and Marine Corps F-35Cs at sea, officials aboard both Vinson and Lincoln say they want more of the aircraft operating within a carrier strike group.

Anderson, when asked why he would like more F-35Cs, pointed to the fighter’s sensing capabilities. Both Bauernschmidt and Anderson described “seamless” integration of the F-35Cs into the carrier air wing.

“It’s the tremendous capability that the aircraft provides from an ability to generate information, the sensors that it has onboard, as well as its ability to distribute that information, not just to other aircraft but to the rest of the force,” Anderson told USNI News.
“It’s a testament to the platform and the folks that fly it too that it can integrate so well in with the rest of the air wing. We don’t have to do unique things with the schedule, the cycle lengths, etc. in order to accommodate it.”

Despite concerns ahead of the first F-35C deployments, Bauernschmidt said at-sea operations disproved some of those worries.

“I think like any new platform that’s introduced, there’s a little bit of angst about how it’s going to go. And I think what ended up happening when we got them was the realization that it was again a fairly seamless integration, regardless of whether it was Marine Corps or Navy,” she said.
“But I think in terms of the noise and some of the things they were concerned about from whether it was a deck density standpoint, or parts availability, or maintenance that they were going to be required to do, I think there were a lot more concerns that were fairly unfounded once, you know, now that we’ve gotten through this deployment [and] we’ve been able to see and operate with them.”