US Warships Struggle To Stay At Sea As China’s Fleet Grows

By Tony Capaccio (Bloomberg) US Navy warships have seen fewer days at sea since 2011 because vessels are breaking down more frequently than expected and taking longer to repair, even as…

By Tony Capaccio (Bloomberg) US Navy warships have seen fewer days at sea since 2011 because vessels are breaking down more frequently than expected and taking longer to repair, even as...

How Much Carbon Could The Ocean Store?

Peter de Menocal, a marine paleoclimatologist and director of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, recently discussed ocean carbon dioxide removal at a recent TEDxBoston: Planetary Stewardship event. In this interview with…

Peter de Menocal, a marine paleoclimatologist and director of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, recently discussed ocean carbon dioxide removal at a recent TEDxBoston: Planetary Stewardship event. In this interview with...

Cross-Alliance Cooperation on the Rise as Market Weakens

By Mike Wackett (The Loadstar) – Ocean carriers are pulling capacity from Chinese export routes and redeploying the ships to more robust tradelanes with growth potential. Moreover, the weakness in the…

By Mike Wackett (The Loadstar) – Ocean carriers are pulling capacity from Chinese export routes and redeploying the ships to more robust tradelanes with growth potential. Moreover, the weakness in the...

‘The Party is Over’ for Container Shipping, Says Hapag-Lloyd CEO

HAMBURG, Feb 1 (Reuters) – Container freight rates will keep declining in the current realignment of shipping demand and supply, said the chief executive of Germany’s liner Hapag Lloyd, the world’s number five by…

HAMBURG, Feb 1 (Reuters) – Container freight rates will keep declining in the current realignment of shipping demand and supply, said the chief executive of Germany’s liner Hapag Lloyd, the world’s number five by...

Metal Shark newbuild on transfer duty for Oregon operator

(JEANERETTE, La.) — Metal Shark recently delivered a welded-aluminum 45 Defiant crew boat to Anchorage Launch Services Co., an Oregon-based operator providing launch, line, pilotage and cargo services to vessels […]

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(JEANERETTE, La.) — Metal Shark recently delivered a welded-aluminum 45 Defiant crew boat to Anchorage Launch Services Co., an Oregon-based operator providing launch, line, pilotage and cargo services to vessels on the Columbia and Willamette rivers.

Designed in-house by the Metal Shark engineering team and built at the company’s Jeanerette, La., production facility, the 47-by-12-foot, twin-diesel waterjet-powered Triumph VII is now in service.

“Our captains, crew and passengers have all been very impressed with the capabilities of our new vessel,” said Alex Scott, chief operating officer at Anchorage Launch. “With an extra emphasis on safety, performance and passenger accommodations, it is clear that Metal Shark paid close attention to the details. The bar has been raised, and our local market is busy taking notes.”

Metal Shark photo

The Metal Shark 45 Defiant pairs a proven hull form with a modern, crew-friendly, mission-optimized arrangement. Built for Anchorage Launch in a bespoke crew boat/pilot boat configuration, the vessel features flat, non-skid decks that run from bow to stern to facilitate quick and secure crew and passenger movement around the vessel.

A rugged fendering system absorbs impacts, a bow push knee adds utility, and an integrated swim platform with dive ladder and removable aft-deck davit aid in dive and rescue operations. Safety rails and grab handles have been placed throughout the craft, and a rooftop boarding platform has been configured to suit the client’s requirements.

Triumph VII features an innovative pilothouse that includes Metal Shark’s signature “pillarless glass,” with a reverse-raked windshield that significantly reduces blind spots. A skylight array provides an unobstructed upward view while operating alongside ships during crew or supply transfer.

The vessel’s climate-controlled cabin has been appointed with UES G-Force high-backed seating for eight, accommodating a two-person crew plus six passengers. A full electronics suite includes multiple Furuno multifunction displays with integrated GPS, radar, depth sounder, a FLIR thermal imaging system, and Icom VHF radios.

Below deck, crew accommodations include an enclosed head compartment with freshwater sink, a dinette and galley with compact refrigerator and microwave. Acoustic insulation and flooring are employed throughout the vessel to reduce noise and vibration.

To meet the client’s performance requirements, Metal Shark equipped Triumph VII with twin 705-horsepower Cummins QSM11 marine diesel inboard engines mated to HamiltonJet HJ-364 waterjets via Twin Disc gears. This combination delivers a cruise speed in the 30-knot range and a top speed approaching 40 knots. A 500-gallon fuel capacity allows for a cruise speed range in excess of 300 nautical miles. Electrical current is supplied via a 9-kW Kohler diesel generator.

– Metal Shark

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Index reflects year of recovery for seafarer happiness

(LONDON) — The latest Seafarers Happiness Index report, published Tuesday by The Mission to Seafarers, reveals average seafarer happiness in the last quarter of 2022 reached 7.69/10, up from 7.3 […]

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(LONDON) — The latest Seafarers Happiness Index report, published Tuesday by The Mission to Seafarers, reveals average seafarer happiness in the last quarter of 2022 reached 7.69/10, up from 7.3 with levels rising across almost all categories, reflecting the sustained upward trend seen throughout the year.

The results of the survey show that even the historically most problematic areas, such as shore leave and access to welfare ashore, are recovering. Crewmembers continued to express their relief at the return of freedom of movement, as well as their increased sense of certainty and stability. The survey was undertaken with the support of the Standard Club and Idwal.

The only area in which there was a decline in satisfaction was connectivity. Quality and cost are still concerns and there is a growing demand for free or inexpensive access as enjoyed by colleagues ashore. Many seafarers believe such access would improve social life at sea with responses like: “We gathered to watch live World Cup football and the atmosphere on board was fantastic.”

It was also noticeable that a significant number of seafarers appeared to have switched employer or trading patterns to be closer to home in case of travel restrictions. In addition, there was a growing number of responses from seafarers from non-traditional maritime labor markets, such as Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.

A year in review – from low to high

In 2022, seafarers’ happiness has steadily increased from its lowest point in Q1 2022 to something of a high-water mark at the end of the year. Q1 2022 saw the lowest level ever recorded with an overall average of 5.85, reflecting the negative impact of the COVID pandemic on seafarers. Other issues such as conflict and contracts also contributed to the low morale and deflated mood among seafarers. Many seafarers felt that their welfare was not being properly addressed and that their work conditions were becoming increasingly difficult.

However, in Q2 2022, there was a significant increase in satisfaction levels, rising from 5.85 to 7.21/10. This was encouraging as it suggested that the worst may be behind us, and as the world began to reopen, this had a positive impact on seafarer sentiment. Additionally, when seafarers were more certain about their return time, they were able to deal more effectively with difficulties at sea.

Q3 2022 saw further improvement, with the overall average climbing to 7.3/10. This was due to improvements in shore leave, access to welfare facilities and initiatives, as well as companies investing in their people on board. These actions made life better at sea, and the sentiment expressed by seafarers reflected this.

Life on board – workload, social cohesion and training

Although the Seafarers Happiness Index data shows progress, there are still persistent issues that need to be addressed such as workload, mental health impacts, and the stresses of a difficult job. There are also concerns about the negative impact on mental health and well-being of too few people aboard ships. The industry is taking steps toward change, with initiatives such as the Sustainable Shipping Initiative Code of Conduct, which aims to go beyond the minimum standards of compliance.

Despite the negative impact of COVID-19 and tensions between Russian and Ukrainian seafarers, there have been clear signs of recovery throughout the year and onboard interactions are once again the most important factor in seafarer satisfaction. However, there are still concerns about isolation among seafarers and a lack of social cohesion on board.

Training for seafarers has improved over the years, but there are mixed responses from seafarers about its effectiveness. To improve, training should be incorporated into the shipboard schedule and not viewed as a chore. Concerns were also raised over the lack of communication and involvement of seafarers in discussions and plans for future fuels training.

By the end of the year, the satisfaction of seafarers had reached a high point, and the sentiment among seafarers had significantly improved. This has raised expectations that the systems supporting seafarer welfare will continue to deliver improvements into 2023.

The Idwal grade

Since Q2 2022, Idwal, a global leader in vessel inspections and one of the lead sponsors of the Seafarers Happiness Index, has been exploring the welfare conditions of seafarers. As part of this approach, it introduced a new inspection method of 12 objective-based questions.

The results of these inspections show a clear correlation between the overall condition of the vessel and crew welfare conditions on board. Further analysis of different vessel types, classification societies and flag states also support this trend. This highlights the importance of the vessel standard in improving seafarer welfare and the positive symbiotic relationship between seafarer happiness and enhanced welfare standards.

“We were pleased and relieved to see increased happiness levels on board throughout the year, and our reports show significant positive progress,” said Ben Bailey, program director at The Mission to Seafarers. “While there remain complexities and challenges in the industry, The Mission to Seafarers continues to highlight the importance of fair treatment, reasonable pay, compassion and understanding in fostering a positive outlook for seafarers.

“However, there are still complex issues that need to be addressed such as abandonment, non-payment or delayed payment of wages, and arbitrary decisions about immigration. We will continue to work closely with shipping companies and managers ashore to shape positive change and to hear more stories and experiences from seafarers through our surveys. We are also mindful of a potential recruitment and retention crisis in 2023 if the trend of seafarers moving from deep sea to short-sea or inland waterways continues.”

To read the latest Seafarers Happiness Index report, click here.

– The Mission to Seafarers

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Crowley Engineering Services achieves ISO 9001:2015 certification

(JACKSONVILLE, Fla.) ­— Crowley Engineering Services (CES) has achieved ISO 9001:2015 certification from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) recognizing the business group’s capabilities. Widely considered as the worldwide standard […]

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(JACKSONVILLE, Fla.) ­— Crowley Engineering Services (CES) has achieved ISO 9001:2015 certification from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) recognizing the business group’s capabilities.

Widely considered as the worldwide standard for quality management systems and practices, the ISO 9001:2015 certification, audited by Platinum Registration, reinforces Crowley Engineering Services’ process and management system as efficient, repeatable and robust.

Crowley photo

The ISO certification applies to Crowley’s traditional maritime solutions or novel development for low- and zero-emissions vessel design, offshore wind or other civil and marine projects.

“This is an important milestone for not only CES, but also our customers,” said Coulston Van Gundy, vice president, Crowley Engineering Services. “Our team worked hard with Platinum Registration’s auditors to demonstrate that we meet the requirements of the standard. Implementing management procedures in accordance with the high standards of ISO allows us to further solidify our position as a leader in the maritime industry and give our customers the confidence that they’ve partnered with one of the best in the business.”

Crowley Engineering Services provides vessel design and engineering, waterfront civil engineering, digital solutions, program and construction management, and research and development. The group is responsible for completing the design and construction management of the company’s eWolf, the first fully electric U.S. tugboat, currently under construction, as well as other low-emission vessel designs.

– Crowley

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As Ice Recedes, Italian Ship Makes Record Journey into the Antarctic

ROME, Jan 31 (Reuters) – An Italian ice-breaker carrying scientists researching in the Antarctic has sailed further south than any ship has done before, the organizers of the voyage said on Tuesday,…

ROME, Jan 31 (Reuters) – An Italian ice-breaker carrying scientists researching in the Antarctic has sailed further south than any ship has done before, the organizers of the voyage said on Tuesday,...

Early Lunar New Year stalls Asian air cargo recovery

The traditional air cargo market slowdown has been exaggerated by an early start to the Lunar New Year and an unfavorable comparison with last year’s robust peak season.

The traditional air cargo market slowdown has been exaggerated by an early start to the Lunar New Year and an unfavorable comparison with last year’s robust peak season.